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Carter Marshall

    Hi everyone! Carter is a sweet, energetic, sometimes a bit crazy 7 year old boy. He loves riding his bike, playing on his x box, and playing with his friends but his favorite thing to do is help Dad. It can be cleaning up the yard, working on cars or fixing something for Mom, as long as he’s helping Dad, he is happy!

    Before Carter was born, he was diagnosed with a heart condition. His heart was beating way to fast. Medication was able to control his heart rate but at 34 weeks I developed severe preeclampsia. Carter was born via c section, not breathing. He was intubated and whisked away to the NICU where he stayed for two weeks. He stayed on the medication for six months and ended up growing out of the heart condition. We were so relieved!

    Around a year old, Carter started having episodes that we thought were seizures. We went in for testing, but everything looked “normal.” Fast forward to five years old and we witnessed a full blown seizure while he was asleep. Carter has had many seizures since then, all testing still appears “normal.”  While some of his seizures happen during the day, most of them happen while he’s asleep. We have a motion detection camera in his room but it doesn’t always pick up his more subtle seizures. As Carter’s mom this is terrifying.

    We started looking into getting a service dog after learning more about epilepsy and SUDEP (sudden unexpected death in epilepsy). A service dog would be able to get Carter help if he started seizing and comfort him when it ended. A dog might even be able to alert us before a seizure happens. Having this extra layer of protection would ease my mind a bit and potentially save Carter’s life.

    The cost of raising, training and placing a service dog is between $40,000 and $60,000. We need to raise $20,000 of that so we are asking for your help. Anything you can give, weather it be a money, a prayer or sharing our story, would be much appreciated.

    Love,

    The Marshall Family

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